A Little More Fall Color

The other day I was taking the little girls out to the dog room when I noticed some of the beautiful color at the back of the garden. So I ran back inside to get my camera.

This is my Red Emperor Japanese maple. I swear, it has never turned this color in the fall before. I always thought it was kind of a dud. I was so happy to see this color on it. And the very next day, it was completely bare!

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Again, this little maple has not done much as far as color change in the fall. Its color this year was just glowing.

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My silly dogwood tree. It never blooms in the spring. But fortunately, it always turns beautiful colors in the fall.

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And just turning and looking toward the front of the garden. The flowering cherry and apple tree are there in the background, and that is the Camperdown elm tree in front of them.

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We have been having quite a bit of rain (YAY!!) It has stopped all of the fires that were burning in California, and has provided some cleaning for the dusty pine trees on my road πŸ™‚

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Fall in the Garden

We’ve finally gotten cool enough weather that some of the trees are starting to change color. Today I went outside and was surprised at how many of them had started to change.

Here is the last rose of the season. Its just huge and spectacular. I brought it inside so I could enjoy it for a bit.

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And here is one of my miniature trees that has done really well.

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And my oldest laceleaf Japanese maple.

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Of course, some of the flowers enjoy the cooler temperatures, and so they are still blooming a bit.

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These zinnias especially seem to like the cooler weather. I can hardly wait to see how my zinnia seeds do next year!

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And just before sunset, the colors looked so pretty, I tried to get a couple of views of the garden.

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I hope everyone has a happy and blessed Thanksgiving!

 

A Chicken and Garden Report

I am so happy. My plan is working. This year, I did not keep the lights on in the evening (so the chickens would keep laying eggs.) Of course, this means I only get 5-7 eggs a day from 22 chickens. BUT, I am happy because all of my chickens are starting to grow their feathers back. Here are some of them:

The white cochins:

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Both of the Black Copper Marans are in full feather:

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And they have finally started laying their dark brown eggs again:

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The Dominique:

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And one of the New Hampshire Reds:

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Both of the Speckled Sussex are coming back into full feather. They were really bald in the last chicken update I did.

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And the self-appointed queen of the yard. I don’t think she’s ever lost too many of her feathers. I’m not so sure she’s the queen. She might just be smart enough to stay away from the other chickens.

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Did I tell you that my apple tree grew ONE apple! I watched it for a long time, sure that the deer or the bear or birds might get it. But one day, it looked ripe enough and I ate it! Yumm!

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A while back, I bought a book on Monet’s garden. It was so interesting to read. And he just was determined to put flowers everywhere. So the next time Kevin came over, I kidded around and said I was going to add some planter beds here. He actually likes building these beds, so he did this for me. I’m very excited. I bought a bunch of spring bulbs from John Scheepers again, plus those specialty seeds that I bought, so I will be able to plant some of them here.

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Of course, all of the dogs have to explore anything new in the garden.

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Kevin came up with a great idea to add some beds to the front of the shade garden. We are going to save that project for next spring.

A Garden Comment and Chicken Report

This is one of the best garden bargains I have ever gotten. I paid $4 for a little rose bush that was not grafted, and this is it just two years later. It is always healthy, and it never stops blooming.

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So today was the day to “steam clean” the chicken coop. That is what I called it, because I wished that was what I could do. First I cleaned all the litter off the floor–a combo of shavings, chicken poop, and food. And it was really dusty. And then I had to bring in the big guns–a ladder and a hose. I wanted to clean off all the chicken shit from their roosts. And believe me, it was a LOT. Because I am a nice person, and I know that chickens like to roost on a shelf rather than a post, most of them roosted on 12 inch and 8 inch boards. Which means they crapped all night long on their roosts. Anyway, that’s enough poop talk. It actually wasn’t quite as hard as I thought it would be. But I was worn out when it was done. Oh, you can see in this picture that I started feeding them wet food. I just soak their chicken food for a few minutes. There is way less waste that way, and they really seem to enjoy it.

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This is Baby’s sister. (did I tell you all that Baby died last spring?) Anyway, she was looking pretty poorly all summer, and then she finally grew a new set of feathers. But she’s already looking a bit threadbare. I don’t know what’s wrong with her, if anything.

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And here she is all fluffed out in her nest box.

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This is Baby’s other sister. She has always maintained her feathers. I don’t think she’s the ruler of the roost. She just seems to stay away from the rest of the chickens.

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She seems to pal around with the professor, and they stay mostly in the second yard. Poor Professor. He hasn’t had a tail for a long time. But if you look closely, you can see a few feather buds back there. I am hopeful.

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This chicken has finished moulting and she is in full feather. I love seeing them like this.

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Here is the Dominic rooster and hen. She has just about finished moulting, and he is just starting to moult. He only has one tail feather right now.

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So here is a sad little chicken (but she doesn’t know it–she’s very perky and inquisitive.) She is moulting, but the whole lack of a tail is so ridiculous. Many of my chickens had that going on. I am hoping that by leaving the lights off this winter, they will not peck each other’s feathers out so much.

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Here is a chicken in full moult. One time I had a banty chicken, and she would moult in November, when it was pretty cold, and she lost every single feather all at once. I felt like I should knit her a sweater!

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And here you can see all the feathers just starting to grow back in on another chicken.

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So there you go. That’s what’s a happening with the chickens. I am still enjoying them a lot. I will enjoy them even more if they keep their feathers this year. And, I have to say, it is a relief to have the coop cleaned out before winter comes.

Its Liriope Time!

I love these liriope plants. I love them so much that I have bought five of them, one at a time, over the years. They all started out in the shade garden, but it was too shady for them, and so one by one, they have all been transplanted to another area of the garden that seems just perfect for them. The one that got eaten by the mole even got transplanted, and is doing very well!

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This is my oldest liriope. I think it may need to be divided. I am always a little afraid of dividing plants.

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Close-up of their funny little blooms:

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Elsewhere in the garden, the zinnias are really doing well. With Lori’s recommendation, I have ordered zinnia seeds from Select Seeds, and am looking forward to having specific zinnia colors in my garden next year. I also ordered some special nasturtiums, and have a plan for those next year too!

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I should mention that we have had unusually cool weather since mid-August, and it looks like it is going to continue for the next week or so. Lovely! Anyway, the salvia loves the cooler weather, and has made a big comeback now.

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I like these striped petunias. They are in a pot in front of the salvia.

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Many of my roses have been blooming. I couldn’t get a good picture of most of them, but here is one. The blooms now are smaller than the spring blooms, but still pretty and still smell good πŸ™‚

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The hydrangea:

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And this plant, which I don’t know the name of. It has a faint minty smell. The bees love it so much. In August I give it a haircut, and then a whole new crop of the little blue blossoms starts up again.

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I am very proud that I have kept all of my little trees alive this year. I go out every morning or evening and give them a sprinkle, as well as giving the Japanese maples a Β sprinkle.

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I planted this baby’s breath plant, but it is a short plant and is in the wrong place, so when i was doing a little weeding, I pulled out a stem of it as well. So I cut one rose to bring inside to enjoy them together. (I should see if I can get that WARNING sign off my window. Its funny how you don’t notice stuff like that until you see a picture.)

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I have to admit that I have done very little weeding or work in the garden this summer besides walking through the garden and watering this and that. I have ordered a bunch of daffodils and tulips again from John Scheepers, and so there will be some work done this fall. In addition, there might be some major transplanting going on.

A Little Garden Report

There’s not a lot going on in the garden right now. But a few improvements have been made, so thought I’d share them.

This is what I see when I drive up. (It looks better in person.) Those are vanilla marigolds, with some petunias between, and sweet alyssum behind. I have enjoyed this area of the garden a lot. I am looking forward to filling it with tulips again for the spring.

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Remember the patchwork pathway? Where I tried to plant plants in the six spots. Yes, that never worked. I think if I had wanted it to work, I should have pre-dug out about a foot of dirt and rocks and replaced it with good soil. So a few weeks ago I told Kevin that I wanted to get rid of the plants. We looked around our pile of unused stuff, and these light colored blocks almost fit perfectly. Except for 1/2 inch that he had to saw off of each of them… Anyway, I am very glad that I don’t have to be sad looking at the plants that don’t want to grow there.

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Costco had these tall solar lights (like 5 or 6 feet tall) on sale. So I got four of them. Two are by the front fence (in the above photo) and a few days ago we put these among the Japanese maples.

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This bed has gone a little wild. I planted some zinnias in there quite a while ago and they just started blooming now. Bringing a bit of cheer to the garden.

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This is a dwarf abutilon that came back from last year, and is blooming like crazy. I like it better than the huge one that takes up a whole garden bed and is scarcely blooming.

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And the weed/morning glories have come back after a few years off! This picture is not re-touched. They really are that brilliant in the morning. Only trouble is, I usually forget to go out and look at them in the morning πŸ™‚

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Okay, unrelated to the garden. I finally started back to work on my rug hooking (this is an upside down view of a giant redwood tree.)

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I glanced over to see all three girls sharing one bed. There are literally three doggie beds in this room, but I guess they all wanted to be in the bed closest to me.

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And that’s about it for this week. The weather has cooled down a bit and we are having a whole week of cooler weather. So wonderful!!

I Went to Ohio!

Last fall I entered one of my rugs “He Holds All Creation Together” in a national contest called Celebrations. Rug hooking is not like quilting. There aren’t too many shows or contests. So when I was accepted into the exhibit in the Originals category, I was VERY excited. They publish a book with pictures and descriptions of all the quilts, and I have looked forward to and bought the Celebrations book each year. They also display the Celebrations rugs at a big rug event in Ohio held at Sauder Village. I’ve always wanted to go to Sauder, and so that’s how I happened to go to Ohio last week. Here I am next to my rug.

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Sauder Village is a fairly large village with some authentic buildings and some reproductions. They have all kinds of demonstrations going on–spinning, weaving, even broom making! The first day I of course visited the farm, and watched a demonstration on milking a goat and making butter. I loved it! When I get tired of chickens, I will turn that into a goat house πŸ™‚

This little building and garden was just charming.

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They had a museum too, which I wandered through. Isn’t this a kick? Imagine getting your mail this way. Amazon might have trouble getting your packages to you in two days.

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And a wooden bike!! Can you believe it?

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Now I only took a picture of this toilet because I would love to have a toilet like this πŸ™‚

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Then there was a famous glass man who actually works there. I went the first day, and stared at all his beautiful glass creations and knew that I was not going to spend that much money on glass. But I was so glad I went back the second day. I watched him work on this glass for a long time. He also had a helper there that was very good at explaining what was going on.

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One day I wandered the back paths of Sauder Village. There was a fur trader there. Did you know that Beaver hides were the main commodity for trading? I also visited the grist mill, where the nice man gave his whole talk just for me. So of course, I bought two pounds of corn meal… Its in the freezer. But I do like corn bread, so I might try making that soon.

I came upon this beautiful conservatory. But by that time I was too hot to even go inside. I just enjoyed the beauty from outside.

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Then one day I thought I’d be more adventurous and headed out to visit a nature preserve. It was rainy, so I just drove through. Everything is so green in Ohio!

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The things I noticed most about this area of Ohio were how extremely straight the roads were, corn fields everywhere, and also small cemeteries just sitting on the side of the road in between the corn fields. I realized I hadn’t taken any pictures of the corn fields, so when I saw this view with the pretty flowers in the foreground, I snapped it.

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On my last day, I didn’t need to get to the airport until 3:30. I googled “things to do in Toledo.” And I saw that they had a zoo! I decided to be adventurous and visit the zoo. But I have to admit, that was a bit of a bust. I was dressed all in black (very comfortable in airports and airplanes.) But not so great for walking MILES in hot humid weather. And yes, it was so hot and humid, most of the animals were hiding…

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They did have a bird aviary that you could walk through, and I really enjoyed that. I like birds. Someday maybe I’ll have some specialty finches again.

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After walking all that time in the heat, I was SO HOT. I googled “frozen yogurt” and found that the only one listed was between the zoo and the airport! Perfection. This was my lunch at 2:30. No apologies for the treats on top. They actually had a yogurt that they called California Tart. How about that? Who knew it was a California thing. Its usually the only frozen yogurt that I get.

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Of course, I haven’t even mentioned the rug show. I spent a great deal of time there, looking at all the rugs. Someone said there was somewhere between 300 and 800 rugs displayed. Oh, and there were vendors too πŸ™‚ If you want to read more about the rug show you can visit my other blog. I haven’t written about it yet. It’ll probably be up by Friday.