A Little Garden News

I came home from my weekend trip last week to find this perfect rose waiting for me! This is the Everlasting Peace rose. It has a beautiful form and a wonderful fragrance. Plus, its my favorite color of pinkšŸ™‚


I bought quite a few pansies and a few other plants to fill some spots in the garden. Its supposed to be the best time to plant pansies and snapdragons for strong spring blooms. This corner bed was a mess. The creeping jenny and the never-ending violets had invaded, plus its mostly shady, plus Noah still loves to run down here and bark at cars going by. So I worked on it for quite a while, andĀ planted the pansies, and a new heuchera in there. And then I made my little prison for it, hopefully to remind NoahĀ that I really don’t want him in there. Ā After looking at this picture, I decided I need one more heuchera to round it out. Oh, and then couple of days after I did all this work, I came out to find that I had planted some of the pansies a little too close to the fence–the deer had come and completely uprooted a few of themšŸ˜¦


This is one of the hydrangea. I didn’t prune it yet, and the flowers have turned a lovely shade of dusty pink. Nice!


Okay. This next picture is proof that I have turned into an old lady. All week I was cleaning and prepping the house for a couple of ladies that I had invited to lunch. The last thing I did was go and pick a few little flowers for a table bouquet. When the agreed-upon arrival time came and went, I decided to give them a call. Sometimes people have a hard time finding my house. “Hello T., are you coming today?” “I thought we agreed on October 7.” oh…..yes, we did. I had even been looking at my calendar during the week to make sure I had everything right…. Well, I enjoyed my nice clean house and the bouquet anyways!


The foxgloves that I have been diligently watering over the long hot summer so that I would have new blooms next spring decided to give me an early show! So excited to see the Ā pink shaded one!


And, it took a LONG time, but look what finally bloomed the last week of September? The cleome that Lori sent me and that I started from seeds. One lone plant, but if Lori is right, it will re-seed itself, and maybe I’ll have a few more next year.



I have more plants to get into the ground this week, and ummm, quite a few bulbs to find places for. Damn that Costco!šŸ™‚

How about a Garden Post?

I saw this rose by chance when I let the dogs out this afternoon, and couldn’t resist–a picture was needed.


Then I noticed that all the roses had decided to bloom today!


MLG was here this morning, and commented that he had heard a local garden show on the radio say that at this time of year, you should let the rose hips develop. If you cut them back, they will grow new canes, but it will get too cold for them to bloom. Anyone ever heard this before?


So…my favorite lantana… a couple of years ago a reader from Australia commented that they consider lantana invasive plants. I think the reason they aren’t invasive where I live is that they only last a year. This year I bought a larger lantana at a nursery, and I think it was Ā one that had wintered over. So it stopped blooming soon after I brought it home, and it just grew and grew all summer.


See? It just took over the whole front of this bed. Just this week it has finally given me some blooms. And then it will be gone. Those plants with the heart-shaped leaves?–those are “money plants” that I grew from seed. They don’t bloom until the second year, so I am really looking forward to seeing them in the spring!


The “giant zinnia” in front of the vanillaĀ marigolds.




The dwarf redĀ abutilon has done well, blooming all summer long.


Close-up. Hmmm. I don’t know what those white specks are. I didn’t see them until I saw this photo.


Sophie says, “oops. not pink.”


MLG was trying to compliment me, and exclaimed, “wow! It looks like a forest.” Umm, yeah. But I live in the forest. This is supposed to look like a gardenšŸ™‚ I have a plan. It involves some aggressive pruning. Part of me is still pleased that I have plants growing so well after so many years of coaxing minimal growth in my pots.


And some special visitors in the garden! I don’t really like bugs. But these guys move so slowly, and even though it looks like they don’t have eyes, they turn their head like they are really watching you or the water. I don’t know if there’s a whole herd of them, or just two that move from place to place, but I’ve enjoyed seeing them.


And! something new. How and where to stack the firewood is always a problem. And then the stacks fall over or get messy. And then there’s the tarps. Anyway, MLG started suggesting some things we could do to make it better, and pretty soon I said, “it sounds like maybe I need to ask J. the contractor about doing this.” MLG shook his head enthusiastically in agreement. So here is my new fancy wood shed. J. the contractor mills his own wood, and the outside boards are actually made from a sugar pine that my neighbor had to take down–isn’t that fun?



And that’s the garden report for this week.

The Garden’s Supporting Cast

There’s lots of plants in the garden that don’t get a lot of press. Because they are not big and fancy and colorful, the way I like things. But all these little plants add to the look of the garden. I decided they needed a feature of their own.

This creeping wire vineĀ is all over the shade garden. I really like the look of it. It will take over (the bunny is just about buried here,) but its easy to keep under control too.


There’s a button fern in there. I need to trim the wiry plant to give it more room to grow.


Creeping Jenny, along with some violets.


Licorice Lemon plant.Ā I really like this plant. I thought it played well against the dark red petunias.


These little pink begonias do well for me. And sometimes they come back year after year.


The violets….This variety has dark green fairly glossy leaves, and so they are attractive even when they’re not blooming. But they are pretty insistent on spreading, so they are a two-edged sword. I am using them to fill in the spaces of one of the stone pathways.


I don’t know what this plant is. But its doing just what MLG wanted it to do–climbing over those big rocks. I had it in a container in the shade garden, and it just about took over the whole garden. So I was going to toss the whole container, and MLG saved its life, by suggesting planting it in the back of the garden. Its doing very well, and it is better than bare dirt!


Another plant I don’t know the name of. But these tiny blue flowers bloom all summer, and the bees LOVE them. I like their intense color.dscn4518

Hollyhocks!! I’m pretty excited about these. I grew them from seeds (from a packet that was a couple of years old!) and I’m looking forward to seeingĀ them bloom next year.


Mondo grass. Another plant I had in a container. It did so well in that container that it almost choked the life out of the Japanese Maple that was in the same container. So When I put that maple in the ground, I saved a couple of clumps of the mondo grass to plant along the front fence line. It has been very slow, but I’m glad to see a few new sprouts coming up.


And I couldn’t resist some pretty pictures! The geranium with the salvia.


My favorite lantana. This is a little plant that Noah almost destroyed when I first planted it. So I moved it over next to the fence to give it a chance to live. The ground there is not that good, but it is really doing well now.





And that’s the garden report for this week. I hope you are enjoying your weekendšŸ™‚

Outside the Garden

Yesterday, Noah spent most of the day sleeping in the house. Very unusual for him (I later discovered it was because his beloved bed had been propped up against the house and was unavailable to him. oops.) Anyway, I guess since he wasn’t in the yard, some visitors felt more comfortable about helping out with some pruning activities.


After the first picture I remembered to move the camera away from the window cross-hatches.


There was a pair of twins.


And a really little baby.


Of course, now they had seen me, and were thinking about their next move.


“But dang, that stuff tasted good!”


The littlest fawn was a really pale color. Later I figured out that her mother was also a paler color.


One of the older fawns.


And now I’ve gone out the door, and they are Ā seriously saying their goodbyes.



They split up, and the mom with two fawns went in one direction, while the mom with the pale fawn went in the opposite direction.



Of course, I don’t want them to eat all my plants (thus the deer fencing.) But I sure do enjoy seeing them close up once in a while, especially the babies.

In other news, I completely forgot to blog about my visit with Shelley!! It has been so great that we have this California/Texas connection, and that we have gotten to visit in person occasionally. I grew up in the Bay Area, and so driving “over the hill” to Santa Cruz was something we did quite often. It brings back great memories when I go down to visit Shelley in Santa Cruz, and now we are creating memories of our own, with our visits to Pacific Grove and fun eating and knitting and talking together. Shelley wrote all about our visit, complete with some pictures–visit her blog for the whole story!

A Little Adventure and Some More Flowers

You Guys!! Did we ever have an adventure around here yesterday. I was gone most of the day. So when I came home, I followed the same routine I always do–I come in through the studio door, find Noah’s bark collar, let him out of his crate, put the collar on, let Bess out of her crate, and then open the door to the mudroom. They both run out through the doggie door, and I follow through the human door. As soon as Noah got outside, he barked once (bark collar) and that’s not that unusual. As soon as I got out the door, I heard something that sounded like one of my pipes or hoses had sprung a big leak and was spraying water somewhere. So I turned my head in the direction of the sound…. and there, curled up in the corner of the house, RIGHT NEXT TO THE DOGGIE DOOR, was a HUGE rattlesnake. He was hissing and rattling, and that was the sound that I heard!!!

Here’s a picture of where he was, you can see how close he was to the doggie door.


So even though I was hyperventilating, I managed to get Noah to come to me, and picked Bess up, and took them carefully in the house. The snake never stopped hissing and rattling, but he didn’t move from his corner. I put the hard plastic thingie in the doggie door (just in case he decided to come inside) and got the dogs back in their crates, and called my neighbors (the best neighbors in the whole wide world,) and asked in a very shaky voice “is Tom there?” So Debbie sent him over. It seemed like it took forever for him to get here (they live about 1/2 mile away.) The whole time I was pacing around the house, and then peaking through the mud room window to make sure the snake didn’t move. That would have been even worse, not knowing where it was!

So….you can see the “scar” on the siding there. Just one shot, and it was over. I made myself spend time outside watering the garden so I wouldn’t get all paranoid about being outside. If I was a better blogger, I would have gone out and taken a long distance shot of the snake while I was waiting for Tom to get over here. You’ll just have to use your imagination.

And to end on a pleasant note–one last look at the rose bouquet in the oak tree.


And a close-up shot of one of the prettiest roses I’ve had this year…


I love these liriope so much. I have five of them and this is the only one that bloomed. I’ve done a little research, and I think I’ll just move all of them to a different location to see if I can make them happier next year.



The color and the substance of the blooms just fascinates me.


I hope you had a great weekend.

In The Garden–What Season Is It?

My oldest laceleaf Japanese Maple thinks its fall. I think it got a little dry and so it decided it was time to change colors!


Is it spring? The rose bouquet in the oak tree fascinates mešŸ™‚



There are at least six blooms up there!


It must be summer. All the annuals continue to thrive.




The white marigolds have finally started blooming in earnest. I put the short ones in too early this spring, and I think they did worse than if I had just been patient and put them in later.


I bought a new hibiscus a few weeks ago. Couldn’t resist, even though I know its not frost-hardy. Aren’t the blooms beautiful?


Beautiful, yes. But a bit too close to pink–Sophie was EXTREMELY interested.


Ha! A Sophie-proof container. Every morning she stops below the pot and stares wistfully up at the blooms. And then she goes and chomps down one of the little blooms on the Abutilon. Her look says “they’re not nearly as tasty, but they’ll do in a pinch.”



I am enjoying the garden and the cooler temps we are having. I hope you all take time to smell the roses along the way.

The Dog Days of Summer

This is the time when, for me, I just have to muscle through and keep taking care of the garden. There is not the huge reward of the springtime blooms. But the plants still need water, more than ever. I am looking forward to fall color from the Japanese Maples, so that is a motivating factor, and I’m babying along a few plants that will reward me with blooms next spring. I still buy a few plants at the nursery to motivate myself, and also to fill in some empty spots and add a bit more color to the garden.

Most of my flowering bushes are huge, and I’m letting them go for now, hoping for a big springtime show, and then I WILL PRUNE them. In the meantime, I keep reading up on the best ways to prune the various plants. MLG has been over, and has helped transplant a few plants, trying to find just the right spot for each of them.

Here’s the scene this week.

The phlox are really huge and tall this year. I cut back the rose of sharon after its first bloom, and it has continued to send out a few buds. I like that geranium that I put in the ground, so I will do that next year (usually I put them in pots.) And I like the salvia, but this year there wasn’t much of it that came back, so I will have to buy another little six-pack.


Best buy this summer: a big $2.50 investment of a six pack of these zinnias. They grew like crazy, and have filled in the area behind the carnation patch.


So I got another zinnia, a little bigger variety.


And then I found a GIANT zinnia this weekšŸ™‚


These gaillardiaĀ have done much better this year. Funny what a little water can do for a plantšŸ™‚


This is the stupidest rose bush. Can you see that huge long stem, going all the way up into the oak tree??? This is the kind of thing that makes me want to replace plants. I am thinking about replacing several of my roses. If you’re going to spend the time and effort to care for roses, I think they should be really nice roses, don’t you?


Here’s the top of that rose, blooming up in the oak branches.


I really like this hydrangea, but it does this every year. The branches don’t seem to be strong enough to support the big flower heads, and so they all bow down like this. I’m going to do some research to see what I can do to encourage stronger stems. Otherwise, I LOVE this hydrangea, and I really love that it blooms in August and looks so nice.


I transplanted thisĀ liriope.Ā I really like them, and I have several of them. This one is the only one that is blooming. Boo…


I like this little pink vine, and the new marigolds seem to have taken hold.


Here. This is what a lot of the garden looks like. Kind of sad and messy. Those purple penstemon just kind of fall over on the ground, and the other firecracker blooms are so rangy. Oh, but you know what? This is where I planted the cleome seeds that Lori sent me, and I THINK that one of them might be growing. Also, it looks like there is a healthy lupine growing, and so maybe that came from Lori in with the cleome seeds. I asked at the local nursery about cleome, and she said that they just aren’t available out here, but that she had other customers from the east coast that also inquired about them. Interesting, don’t you think?


This double impatiens is so pretty, but this is what it always looks like. I think its just too hot for an impatien to be happy. If I move it further into the shade, it doesn’t bloom at all.


Also, I think its called the dog days of summer because this is the time everything is so dry, and the dogs bring bits of the outdoors inside every time they come in and out…its a conundrum–do I clean, or do I water?